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Milho 4

Corn Porridge

I swear I’ve never heard of sweet corn porridge until a few years ago. For me, corn porridge was xarém! I remember my grandgrandma eating maizena porridge with sugar when I was a kid, but I didn’t even know maizena was cornstarch back then.
I’m always writing about stuff I learnt in cooking school. Of course I learnt a lot about food just because I was in cooking school, but that wasn’t the only reason. I learnt a lot, culturally speaking, specially because of the school’s environment.
‘Til then, I was just attending to school with people from the same town or close villages, but that school was different. There were students from all over the country. The great majority were from the Algarve, of course, but people would come from everywhere in Portugal to study there. And the cultural difference were huge, of course. You learn a lot in such environment. And that was how I found out that corn porridge could be sweet.
I love oatmeal porridge. It’s almost a daily staple in my diet. I also like quinoa, millet and rice porridge, but this recipe is something I’ve been thinking about for a long time. I wanted to make a corn porridge, but I didn’t want to use corn flour or cornmeal, first because it takes a long time to cook and also because I wanted to make something healthier with less processed foods.
I would say this corn porridge will please a lot of my readers.

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Arroz Main

Rice Porridge with Wild Berries

Rice for breakfast may sound weird to me that I’m portuguese and pretty much to all the people living in the western world. But, in many cultures, specially in Asia, of course, rice is present in pretty much every single meal, including breakfast.
Rice with raw egg and nattō in Japan, soup with rice and vegetables in China, white rice and lentils dahl in India, rice with fried egg in the Philippines, kuy teav with rice noodles in Cambodja or rice with fried fish in Indonesia. These are not dinner or lunch, but, in fact, the first meal of the day for most people.
When I’m asked how does a traditional portuguese breakfast looks like, most times I don’t know what to answer.
When I was a kid I used to eat cereal with milk, then I turned myself to toasts with butter and coffee with milk and just when I was older I realized I could also eat fruit, smoothies and other stuff. Of course I’ve also been through the boiled eggs, tuna with chickpeas and chicken breasts phase, like any other idiot in the gym.
But, after all, how does a typical portuguese breakfast looks like? Most of my friends didn’t even use to take it. Unless an espresso and four cigarettes until lunch time could count as breakfast. Ok, ok, some would also eat a pastel de nata (portuguese custard pie).
When it comes to the islanders from the little island where I’m from, they like to eat their pork sandwich with a cold beer in the morning. But most of them start working at 4:00AM! After four or five hours of work, breakfast doesn’t really taste like breakfast does it?

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Black Bean Soup

My favorite soups have always been rubble soups. I don’t know if this even makes any sense in english, but a rubble soup in portuguese is that kind of chunky soup you make with everything you have at home. Anyways, when I was a kid, I remember that I would only eat pureed soups. Even that tiny bit of spinach would ruin my meal. But what kid likes soup anyways? In fact, the only thing I recall enjoying when I was a child was a nice ice cream, a cake, a chocolate, a soda, no real food at all.
Since I really started enjoying food, my favorite soups have always been the rubble ones. Everything in the pot, complete chaos – meat, beans, sausage, cabbage, potato, turnip, pumpkin, everything you could possibly have in your fridge.

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Miso Soup

Miso is a traditional japanese paste obtained through the fermentation of soybeans with salt and koji (some fungus variety). It is also possible to find varieties made from fermented barley or brown rice. In Japan cuisine this paste is used to season meat, fish, prepare sauces, fillings or even soups. Like almost every oriental fermented food, it is quite salty, so you may take it easy on your salt intake when cooking with miso. On the other hand, this paste is super rich in vitamins, minerals, proteins and probiotics. A true spectacle to the gut, I would say.

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Some sort of Milk Bread

First time I had a hot dog served in a hot dog bun was when I joined 5th grade. There, in my school, they used to serve timg00006142he hot dog with that american style bun that looks like milk bread. I clearly remember the first time I tried it – it was disgusting. Sweet bread with a sausage, ketchup and mostard? WTF??? The few times I had a hot dog before that it was on a baguete or in a papo-seco (a typical portuguese bun).

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Macaroni tutte le verdure

So who doesn’t like a nice pasta right? And who doesn’t like some old good caponata right? And who wouldn’t like caponata WITH pasta right? And you probably don’t even know what caponata is right? Yeah, I figured . “Caponata (Sicilian: capunata) is a Sicilian eggplant (aubergine) dish consisting of a cooked vegetable salad made […]

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