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Bagels 7

Bagels

I’ve been looking for some sort of whole grain flour based bagels for a long time and I couldn’t find it in any groceries shop. I find gluten-free bagels everywhere, but what’s the point on buying a product made out of even more refined flours than regular bread flour? Of course it is important to have these alternatives avaiable. I’m sure people who suffer from celiac disease or gluten intolerance are very thankful for that, but the truth is that, normally, the final product is still quite unhealthy. Very rarely you’ll find a gluten-free product that is not made out if highly processed flours.
Well, here, at the house, we have no gluten issues and so, gluten-free bagels will have to wait. Specially because I don’t have much experience with gluten-free breads and whole wheat recipes are already complicated enough.

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falafel 5

Falafel

I already mentioned my great fascination for the word tzatziki. Today I bring you me great fascination for the word falafel. If tzatziki sounds like a legendary sword from the Otoman Empire, falafel was, certainly, the name of some pharaoh from ancient Egypt.
“Falafel III, The Shining One, son of Mehotep, inherited the throne at the age of seven, succeeding to his brother Takelot IV.”
Notice that these are also spectacular names for football players.

I recall my first time eating falafel like if it was yesterday – it was in Joshua’s in the Forum Algarve when I was about 15 or 16 years old, right before heading to a tuning meeting.
I actually had no ideia what I was ordering. I just did it because it had a stupid name. In fact, almost every dish in Joshua’s has a spectacular name. But 15 years ago, in the Algarve, all that was quite new and unknown for me. I ended up eating a baguette from Pans & Company. The falafel tasted like pigeon poop.

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Arroz Main

Rice Porridge with Wild Berries

Rice for breakfast may sound weird to me that I’m portuguese and pretty much to all the people living in the western world. But, in many cultures, specially in Asia, of course, rice is present in pretty much every single meal, including breakfast.
Rice with raw egg and nattō in Japan, soup with rice and vegetables in China, white rice and lentils dahl in India, rice with fried egg in the Philippines, kuy teav with rice noodles in Cambodja or rice with fried fish in Indonesia. These are not dinner or lunch, but, in fact, the first meal of the day for most people.
When I’m asked how does a traditional portuguese breakfast looks like, most times I don’t know what to answer.
When I was a kid I used to eat cereal with milk, then I turned myself to toasts with butter and coffee with milk and just when I was older I realized I could also eat fruit, smoothies and other stuff. Of course I’ve also been through the boiled eggs, tuna with chickpeas and chicken breasts phase, like any other idiot in the gym.
But, after all, how does a typical portuguese breakfast looks like? Most of my friends didn’t even use to take it. Unless an espresso and four cigarettes until lunch time could count as breakfast. Ok, ok, some would also eat a pastel de nata (portuguese custard pie).
When it comes to the islanders from the little island where I’m from, they like to eat their pork sandwich with a cold beer in the morning. But most of them start working at 4:00AM! After four or five hours of work, breakfast doesn’t really taste like breakfast does it?

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Black Bean Soup

My favorite soups have always been rubble soups. I don’t know if this even makes any sense in english, but a rubble soup in portuguese is that kind of chunky soup you make with everything you have at home. Anyways, when I was a kid, I remember that I would only eat pureed soups. Even that tiny bit of spinach would ruin my meal. But what kid likes soup anyways? In fact, the only thing I recall enjoying when I was a child was a nice ice cream, a cake, a chocolate, a soda, no real food at all.
Since I really started enjoying food, my favorite soups have always been the rubble ones. Everything in the pot, complete chaos – meat, beans, sausage, cabbage, potato, turnip, pumpkin, everything you could possibly have in your fridge.

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