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Carob and Orange Moist Cake

The best oranges in the world come from the Algarve.
Many aromas and tastes remind me my country, but very few foods are best representative of the south of Portugal than the orange.
Orange is on of my favorite fruits. Even living in Norway, where basically all the fruit tastes like crap (yes, sorry to inform you, my norwegian friends, but it’s true), I’m still eating oranges on a daily basis. Unfortunately, and just as the great, great majority of fruit in Norway, it’s imported. Normally from South Africa, sometimes from northern Spain. And just like almost all the imported fruit, it’s crap. This have nothing to do with the country where it comes from, of course, but simply with the fact of being harvested too soon to be exported.
Everytime I go home and I taste an orange it’s like I remember the true taste of the fruit. “Oh yeah, that’s true, this how oranges taste like!”.
My region have many fantastic products, namely ALL the fruit. But some of my favorite are, undoubtedly, orange, carob, almonds and figs.

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Apple Brownie

Dude, call whatever the heck you want to your food, clothes, music, who cares? I’ll call this cake an apple brownie, just because the texture reminds me of a brownie. This is my blog, I call it whatever the fuck I want. There is nothing wrong with it.

And don’t get me wrong with the text above, there is nothing less honorable on selling food or something else on a trail or RV. But don’t try to sell people the ultimate organic chickpea vegan burger with homemade sourdough bread, freshly squeezed OJ and sweet potato fries for 10€ when it doesn’t worth 5€!!!

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Arroz Main

Rice Porridge with Wild Berries

Rice for breakfast may sound weird to me that I’m portuguese and pretty much to all the people living in the western world. But, in many cultures, specially in Asia, of course, rice is present in pretty much every single meal, including breakfast.
Rice with raw egg and nattō in Japan, soup with rice and vegetables in China, white rice and lentils dahl in India, rice with fried egg in the Philippines, kuy teav with rice noodles in Cambodja or rice with fried fish in Indonesia. These are not dinner or lunch, but, in fact, the first meal of the day for most people.
When I’m asked how does a traditional portuguese breakfast looks like, most times I don’t know what to answer.
When I was a kid I used to eat cereal with milk, then I turned myself to toasts with butter and coffee with milk and just when I was older I realized I could also eat fruit, smoothies and other stuff. Of course I’ve also been through the boiled eggs, tuna with chickpeas and chicken breasts phase, like any other idiot in the gym.
But, after all, how does a typical portuguese breakfast looks like? Most of my friends didn’t even use to take it. Unless an espresso and four cigarettes until lunch time could count as breakfast. Ok, ok, some would also eat a pastel de nata (portuguese custard pie).
When it comes to the islanders from the little island where I’m from, they like to eat their pork sandwich with a cold beer in the morning. But most of them start working at 4:00AM! After four or five hours of work, breakfast doesn’t really taste like breakfast does it?

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Spicy Roasted Chickpeas

Ladies and gentlemen, I present you the legume. Legumes are plants or fruits/seeds in the family fabaceae. Well-known members of this family are beans, peas, chickpeas, lentils, soybeans and peanuts (yes, peanuts are legumes, not nuts).
After meat, poultry and fish, legumes provide more protein per serving than other types of food. Besides, it is a very good source of dietary fiber and minerals and, like most plant-based foods, no cholesterol. Every cup of chickpeas, for example, contains 15 gr. of protein (29% DV), 4.7 mg of iron (26% DV), 80.4 mg of calcium (8% DV), 78.7 mg of magnesium (20% DV), 2.5 mg of zinc (17% DV), 12.5 g of fiber (50% DV) and the list goes on.

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Miso Soup

Miso is a traditional japanese paste obtained through the fermentation of soybeans with salt and koji (some fungus variety). It is also possible to find varieties made from fermented barley or brown rice. In Japan cuisine this paste is used to season meat, fish, prepare sauces, fillings or even soups. Like almost every oriental fermented food, it is quite salty, so you may take it easy on your salt intake when cooking with miso. On the other hand, this paste is super rich in vitamins, minerals, proteins and probiotics. A true spectacle to the gut, I would say.

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Seitan, mushrooms and port wine

I promised I would post more Christmas recipes. I always keep my promises. But I’m portuguese. And of course I’m late as f*ck. Anyways, this blog was never about fancy food. I have always tried to share simple, handy and easy recipes. Tasty but healthy food, that does not demmand much technical knowledge, made out of cheap and easy to find products. That has always been my goal with this project. But every once in a while it’s nice to eat something a bit more complex. Something that says “I’m such a f*ckin good chef!”. I hope I’m still on time to inspire someone to inspire someone else.

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