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Açaí

It is said that one becomes a bit more brazilian by eating that tiny berry. Not that you should want to become brazilian, but they are the kings of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu after all. Anyways, no food has been as representative of Brazilian Jiu-jitsu as the well known açaí.
The açaí berry is a small, round and black-purple fruit, similiar but much smaller than a grape. It comes from a special type of palm tree that grows in very specific rigions in the globe such as the amazon rainforest and other parts of the northern south america. The berry is normally processed into a thick juice and sold frozen all around the globe. Though in Brazil it is used in juices, candy, ice cream, smoothies and compots. The seeds are even used in jewelry and the oil and pulp in many different hygiene products. Not that surprising for a country that produces pretty much 85% of all the açaí sold around the world.
The açaí berry is a very peculiar fruit with very peculiar macros. In every 100 gr. of pure açaí it contains 13 gr. of protein and 17 gr. of fat. Quite rich for a tiny fruit. Keep it mind that these values are for the pure berry itself, so the usual frozen açaí nutritional value is quite different and varies a lot. Several studies also show that açaí berries may be the most antioxidant rich fruit on the planet.

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Arroz Main

Rice Porridge with Wild Berries

Rice for breakfast may sound weird to me that I’m portuguese and pretty much to all the people living in the western world. But, in many cultures, specially in Asia, of course, rice is present in pretty much every single meal, including breakfast.
Rice with raw egg and nattō in Japan, soup with rice and vegetables in China, white rice and lentils dahl in India, rice with fried egg in the Philippines, kuy teav with rice noodles in Cambodja or rice with fried fish in Indonesia. These are not dinner or lunch, but, in fact, the first meal of the day for most people.
When I’m asked how does a traditional portuguese breakfast looks like, most times I don’t know what to answer.
When I was a kid I used to eat cereal with milk, then I turned myself to toasts with butter and coffee with milk and just when I was older I realized I could also eat fruit, smoothies and other stuff. Of course I’ve also been through the boiled eggs, tuna with chickpeas and chicken breasts phase, like any other idiot in the gym.
But, after all, how does a typical portuguese breakfast looks like? Most of my friends didn’t even use to take it. Unless an espresso and four cigarettes until lunch time could count as breakfast. Ok, ok, some would also eat a pastel de nata (portuguese custard pie).
When it comes to the islanders from the little island where I’m from, they like to eat their pork sandwich with a cold beer in the morning. But most of them start working at 4:00AM! After four or five hours of work, breakfast doesn’t really taste like breakfast does it?

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